SNP array and FISH analysis of a proband with a 22q13.2- 22qter duplication shed light on the molecular origin of the rearrangement.

SNP array and FISH analysis of a proband with a 22q13.2- 22qter duplication shed light on the molecular origin of the rearrangement.

BMC Med Genet. 2015;16:47

Authors: Magri C, Marchina E, Bertini V, Traversa M, Savio G, Pilotta A, Piovani G

Abstract
BACKGROUND: In about one third of healthy subjects, the microscopic analysis of chromosomes reveals heteromorphisms with no clinical implications: for example changes in size of the short arm of acrocentric chromosomes. In patients with a pathological phenotype, however, a large acrocentric short arm can mask a genomic imbalance and should be investigated in more detail. We report the first case of a chromosome 22 with a large acrocentric short arm masking a partial trisomy of the distal long arm, characterized by SNP array. We suggest a possible molecular mechanism underlying the rearrangement.
CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 15-year-old dysmorphic girl with low grade psychomotor retardation characterized by a karyotype with a large acrocentric short arm of one chromosome 22. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a normal karyotype with a very intense Q-fluorescent and large satellite on the chromosome 22 short arm. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis showed a de novo partial trisomy of the 22q13.2-qter chromosome region attached to the short arm of chromosome 22. SNP-array analysis showed that the duplication was 8.5 Mb long and originated from the paternal chromosome. Haplotype analysis revealed that the two paternal copies of the distal part of chromosome 22 have the same haplotype and, therefore, both originated from the same paternal chromosome 22. A possible molecular mechanism that could explain this scenario is a break-induced replication (BIR) which is involved in non-reciprocal translocation events.
CONCLUSION: The combined use of FISH and SNP arrays was crucial for a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying this rearrangement. This strategy could be applied for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cryptic chromosomal rearrangements.

PMID: 26149167 [PubMed - in process]

Japonica array: improved genotype imputation by designing a population-specific SNP array with 1070 Japanese individuals.

Related Articles

Japonica array: improved genotype imputation by designing a population-specific SNP array with 1070 Japanese individuals.

J Hum Genet. 2015 Jun 25;

Authors: Kawai Y, Mimori T, Kojima K, Nariai N, Danjoh I, Saito R, Yasuda J, Yamamoto M, Nagasaki M

Abstract
The Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization constructed the reference panel (referred to as the 1KJPN panel), which contains >20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from whole-genome sequence data from 1070 Japanese individuals. The 1KJPN panel contains the largest number of haplotypes of Japanese ancestry to date. Here, from the 1KJPN panel, we designed a novel custom-made SNP array, named the Japonica array, which is suitable for whole-genome imputation of Japanese individuals. The array contains 659 253 SNPs, including tag SNPs for imputation, SNPs of Y chromosome and mitochondria, and SNPs related to previously reported genome-wide association studies and pharmacogenomics. The Japonica array provides better imputation performance for Japanese individuals than the existing commercially available SNP arrays with both the 1KJPN panel and the International 1000 genomes project panel. For common SNPs (minor allele frequency (MAF)>5%), the genomic coverage of the Japonica array (r(2)>0.8) was 96.9%, that is, almost all common SNPs were covered by this array. Nonetheless, the coverage of low-frequency SNPs (0.5%<MAF⩽5%) of the Japonica array reached 67.2%, which is higher than those of the existing arrays. In addition, we confirmed the high quality genotyping performance of the Japonica array using the 288 samples in 1KJPN; the average call rate 99.7% and the average concordance rate 99.7% to the genotypes obtained from high-throughput sequencer. As demonstrated in this study, the creation of custom-made SNP arrays based on a population-specific reference panel is a practical way to facilitate further association studies through genome-wide genotype imputations.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 25 June 2015; doi:10.1038/jhg.2015.68.

PMID: 26108142 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A girl with incomplete Prader-Willi syndrome and negative MS-PCR, found to have mosaic maternal UPD-15 at SNP array.

Related Articles

A girl with incomplete Prader-Willi syndrome and negative MS-PCR, found to have mosaic maternal UPD-15 at SNP array.

Am J Med Genet A. 2015 Jun 24;

Authors: Morandi A, Bonnefond A, Lobbens S, Carotenuto M, Del Giudice EM, Froguel P, Maffeis C

Abstract
The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by lack of expression of paternal allele of the 15q11.2-q13 region, due to deletions at paternal 15q11.2-q13 (<70%), maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 (mat-UPD 15) (30%) or imprinting defects (1%). Hyperphagia, intellectual disabilities/behavioral disorders, neonatal hypotonia, and hypogonadism are cardinal features for PWS. Methylation sensitive PCR (MS-PCR) of the SNRPN locus, which assesses the presence of both the unmethylated (paternal) and the methylated (maternal) allele of 15q11.2-q13, is considered a sensitive reference technique for PWS diagnosis regardless of genetic subtype. We describe a 17-year-old girl with severe obesity, short stature, and intellectual disability, without hypogonadism and history of neonatal hypotonia, who was suspected to have an incomplete PWS. The MS-PCR showed a normal pattern with similar maternal and paternal electrophoretic bands. Afterwards, a SNP array showed the presence of iso-UPD 15, that is, UPD15 with two copies of the same chromosome 15, in about 50% of cells, suggesting a diagnosis of partial PWS due to mosaic maternal iso-UPD15 arisen as rescue of a post-fertilization error. A quantitative methylation analysis confirmed the presence of mosaic UPD15 in about 50% of cells. We propose that complete clinical criteria for PWS and MS-PCR should not be considered sensitive in suspecting and diagnosing partial PWS due to mosaic UPD15. In contrast, clinical suspicion based on less restrictive criteria followed by SNP array is a more powerful approach to diagnose atypical PWS due to UPD15 mosaicism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID: 26109092 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

ISPD gene homozygous deletion identified by SNP array confirms prenatal manifestation of Walker-Warburg syndrome.

Related Articles

ISPD gene homozygous deletion identified by SNP array confirms prenatal manifestation of Walker-Warburg syndrome.

Eur J Med Genet. 2015 Jun 15;

Authors: Trkova M, Krutilkova V, Smetanova D, Becvarova V, Hlavova E, Jencikova N, Hodacova J, Hnykova L, Hroncova H, Horacek J, Stejskal D

Abstract
Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a rare form of autosomal recessive, congenital muscular dystrophy that is associated with brain and eye anomalies. Several genes encoding proteins involved in abnormal α-dystroglycan glycosylation have been implicated in the aetiology of WWS, most recently the ISPD gene. Typical WWS brain anomalies, such as cobblestone lissencephaly, hydrocephalus and cerebellar malformations, can be prenatally detected through routine ultrasound examinations. Here, we report two karyotypically normal foetuses with multiple brain anomalies that corresponded to WWS symptoms. Using a SNP-array examination on the amniotic fluid DNA, a homozygous microdeletion was identified at 7p21.2p21.1 within the ISPD gene. Published data and our findings led us to the conclusion that a homozygous segmental intragenic deletion of the ISPD gene causes the most severe phenotype of Walker-Warburg syndrome. Our results also clearly supports the use of chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line diagnostic test in patients with a foetus with one or more major structural abnormalities identified on ultrasonographic examination.

PMID: 26087224 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Page 1 of 4912345»102030...Last »

RSS Genotyping industry news